James Scammon

James SCAMMON is my first cousin, seven times removed; we are related through his grandparents, Dominicus and Hannah (JORDAN) SCAMMON.  James was born 1 August 1721, in Saco[1], Maine the seventh of ten children of Captain Humphrey and Elizabeth (JORDAN) SCAMMON.  James was a yeoman [farmer], a mill owner and also a reported blacksmith[2].  James married Hannah PLAISTED, daughter of Elisha and Hannah (WHEELWRIGHT) PLAISTED in 1741.  James and Hannah had five children: James, Hannah, Nathaniel, Elizabeth and Mary.  James died in 1753 and is buried in the Saco Burying Ground in Saco, Maine.

In about 1710/11 Humphrey SCAMMON, his wife Elizabeth, their sons Humphrey, Jr. and Samuel were taken by Indians and carried to Canada, they were released a year later and were able to return to their home exactly the same as it had been left; that was James’ grandparents, father and uncle.  In 1723 the Indians attacked the SCAMMON family again, but this time it was only their daughter Mary (James’ older sister) was taken, she had been visiting an aunt in Scarborough where she was attacked.  She was then sent by the governor to the Convent of the Ursulines at Three Point Rivers to be educated because “she was an unusually bright child.”  Her name was known as Mary Ann Seaman or Sxamen.  In 1725, she renounced the religion she had been born to and became a Catholic, because of her new found faith she chose to live and die a Catholic, she was baptized the same day, and went to live with an aunt that had previously been taken captive, and living in Canada, she stayed to live in Canada.  She never returned to her family.[3]


[1] Edgar Yates, “Early Vital Records of Saco and Biddeford, ME,” New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 71 (1917), online archives, American Ancestors (www.americanancestors.org : accessed online 18 July 2013), “A book of records of berths in Saco and Biddiford”.

[2] Edgar Yates, “Early Vital Records of Saco and Biddeford, ME,” New England Historical and Genealogical Register, 71 (1917), online archives, American Ancestors (www.americanancestors.org : accessed online 18 July 2013), “A book of records of berths in Saco and Biddiford”.

[3] Emma Lewis Coleman, New England Captives Carried to Canada: Between 1677 and 1760 During the French and Indian Wars (Boston, Mass.: New England Historic and Genealogical Society, 1925), 4, 5, 20, 21, 28, 29, 139, 147-151, 243, 254, 396.

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