Dominicus Jordan

Dominicus JORDAN is my seventh great grandfather.  He is the second child born to Reverend Robert and Sarah (WINTER) JORDAN, about 1647 in Cape Elizabeth, Maine.[1]  About 1675 Dominicus with his parents and his siblings left the area and moved to Portsmouth New Hampshire during King Philip’s War after the family home was attacked and burned by Indians.  Dominicus married Hannah (Ruhanah) TRISTRAM 1 April 1681 in Cape Elizabeth, returning to the Spurwink area to live.  Dominicus and Hannah had seven children:  Dominicus Jr., Samuel, Sarah, Mary Ann (Arabella), Elizabeth, Hannah, and Nathaniel.  Dominicus was a prominent man in the settlement, served on several grand juries 1690 and 1691.[2]  He was a prominent man in the community, a trustee, and held offices within the community.  He was a signer of several official town and province documents from 1681 until his death in 1703.  “He was a man of uncommon size, and of great strength and endurance.”  His gun, held by the Maine Historical Society, was always strapped to his back in ready for immediate use.  Dominicus’ land bordered the Spurwink River; he had a blockhouse on a flat piece of land.  He was known as “Indian Killer,” a fiend of the Indian’s in times of peace and a feared enemy at times of war.  On the 10th of August in 1703 Dominicus received a friendly call from the local Indians, where “he met death unarmed in the treachery.”  He was in the midst of trading furs for articles they wanted, when he was helping one another taking the opportunity struck Dominicus and served a killing blow to him.  The Indians then gathered his wife and children and took them to Trois Rivers, Canada.[3]

There is more written about Dominicus and his family in several books such as:  The Family Jordan compiled by Adelbert Jean “Andy” Annonson and edited by Roland Gene Jordan.  The Jordan Family Memorial by Tristram Frost Jordan.  New England Captives Carried to Canada between 1677 and 1760 During the French and Indian Wars by Emma Lewis Coleman.  Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire by Noyes, Libby and Davis.  There are also several mentions of the life of the Jordan men in several of the Maine history books.


[1] Godfrey Memorial Library, comp., American Genealogical-Biographical Index (AGBI) (Name: Ancestry.com Operations Inc; Location: Provo, UT, USA; Date: 1999;), Database online.

[2] York County, record holder, “Maine: Early Wills & Deeds,” New England Historical and Genealogical Society, American Ancestors (www.americanancestors.org : online access 28 July 2013), Dominicus Jordan juror.  York County, record holder, “Maine: Early Wills & Deeds,” New England Historical and Genealogical Society, American Ancestors (www.americanancestors.org : access online 28 July 2013), Dominicus Jordan grand juror.  York County, record holder, “Maine: Early Wills & Deeds,” New England Historical and Genealogical Society, American Ancestors (www.americanancestors.org : access online 28 July 2013), Dominicus Jordan juror.

[3] Emma Lewis Coleman, New England Captives Carried to Canada: Between 1677 and 1760 During the French and Indian Wars (Boston, Mass.: New England Historic and Genealogical Society, 1925), part II 25-28.  Sybil Noyes Charles Thornton Libby, Walter Goodwin Davis, Genealogical Dictionary of Maine and New Hampshire (Portland, Maine: The Southworth-Anthoensen Press, 1928–1939), 389.

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