Category Archives: Surname of the Week

Surname of the week QUIMBY / QUINBY

Variants of the surname:  QUIMBY, QUENBY, QUINBY, QUEMBY, QUYNBY, QUERENBY, QUARMBY, QUESENBERRY, QUISENBERRY, QUINSBY, QUESNBY, QUYMBY

English surname, it is a locational name originating in a village called Quenby in the county of Leicestershire.  The village name and hence the surname is of 7th century Olde English origins, but the later Danish-Viking overlap. The translation of is from the words “Cwene-berg” and means “The Queen’s Manor”, the “berg” was later translated to “bi” from the Danish.  It is associate with the kingdom of Mercia[1]

My QUIMBY relations:

  1. Stephen Hart QUIMBY 1800-; married Elizabeth
    1. Ambrose C. QUIMBY 1823-1897; married Sarah Ann JORDAN
      1. Albion Keith Parris QUIMBY 1849-1935
      2. Franklin QUIMBY 1854-; married Clara A. BRAY
      3. Nathan QUIMBY 1858-
  2. Charles QUIMBY 1794-; married Mary Weeks ROBERTS
    1. Johnson M. QUIMBY; married Adeline A. JORDAN
  3. Elizabeth W. “Betsey” QUIMBY 1829-1903
  4. Isaac Delma QUIMBY 1878-1958; married Jennie May CLAY
    1. Evelyn Winifred QUIMBY 1908-
  5. Jacob QUIMBY; married Harriet T. MURCH
    1. Harriet Frances QUIMBY -1909
  6. Isaac QUIMBY -1891; married Martha WRIGHT
  7. Lydia QUIMBY 1787- ; married Joseph PARTRIDGE
  8. Mary QUIMBY; married Levi BRACEY

 

My QUINBY relations:

  1. Nathan QUINBY; married Rosina PARTRIDGE
    1. Sarah QUINBY 1783-1864; married Thomas JORDAN

[1] www.surnamedb.com

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Surname GAGNÉ

Surname variants:  GAGNE, GAGNÉ, GAGNER, GONYEA, ENGAINE, INGAYN, GAIN, GAYN, GAINES, INGAIN, ENGHAM, ENGAINE, D’ENGAIN, E’ENGAYNE, ENGAME, ENGAM, GAYNE, GAYNES, ANGAIN, GAYNEY, DENGAINE, DENGAYNE, DANGAIN, D’ANGAIN

Name meaning: French occupational name for a farmer or peasant, from Old French ga(i)gnier “to cultivate or work (the land)”, Numerous variants and Americanized forms are found.[1]

Early origins:

The surname GAGNE was first found in Huntingdonshire where they held a family seat as Lords of the Manor.  After the Battle of the Hastings in 1066, many became under-tenants and adopted the Norman system of surnames which identified an under-tenant with his holdings.

There are many variations on the spelling of the name.  Old and Middle English lacked defined spelling rules, and the introduction of Norman French added an unfamiliar ingredient to the English.  French and Latin also influenced the spellings, finally Medieval scribes generally spelled words according to how they sounded.[2]

GAGNÉ in my family:

    1. Ignace GAGNÉ 12 March 1656-20 July 1702; husband to Louise TREMBLAY (9th great grandparents)
      1. François Xavier GAGNÉ 24 February 1698-March 1743 husband to Marie-Geneviève FILON (8th great grandparents)
        1. Marie-Louise GAGNÉ 1720-1796; wife to Paul SIMARD
        2. Marie-Joseph GAGNÉ 1722-1776; wife to Pierre SIMARD
        3. Marie-Anne GAGNÉ 1724-1766; wife to Joseph AMOIT-VILLENEUVE AND Augustin DELAVONE
        4. Marie-Geneviève GAGNÉ 1726-1798; wife to Étienne BOUCHARD (7th great grandparents)
        5. François GAGNÉ 1728-1749
        6. Marie-Michelle GAGNÉ 1729-1767; wife to Étienne TREMBLAY
        7. Jean-Baptist GAGNÉ 1732-1792; husband to Marguerite-Appoline SIMARD
        8. Joseph GAGNÉ 1733-1784
        9. Louis GAGNÉ; husband to Cecile-Victorie SAUTON
        10. Raphaël GAGNÉ 1738-1813; husband to Marie-Geneviève DUFOUR
        11. Ignace GAGNÉ 1740; husband to Victoire-Apolline LAFOREST
        12. Basile GAGNÉ 1743-1748

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Surname CADE

English: metonymic occupational name for a cooper, from Middle English, Old French cade ‘cask’, ‘barrel’ (of Germanic origin, probably akin to the root mentioned in 1) English nickname for a gentle or inoffensive person, from Middle English cade ‘domestic animal,’ ‘pet’ (unknown origin).

Most likely those with the surname are from the British Isles.  The majority of the Cade’s emigrating to the United States came between 1821 and 1891.

The coat of arms granted to a Cade family depicts on a white shield, a blue fesse between two red lions passant guardant.  The Crest is a red demi lion rampant.

The first instance of the name in records occurred in 1186 that of Eustace Cade in the “Pipe Rolls of Lincolnshire”.

My connection to the name:

Mary CADE birth about 1575 in England; married John SHORTRIDGE.

She was my eleventh great grandmother.

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